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Teddies Bristol Day Nursery and Preschool


We have been rated Outstanding in our latest Ofsted inspection. We offer a warm, welcoming environment supporting the transition from home to nursery and provide excellent nutritionally-balanced menus using fresh ingredients prepared by our own chef.


We are open Monday to Friday from 08:00 to 18:00

Get directions to Teddies Bristol Day Nursery and Preschool
Clanage Road, Bower Aston | Bristol BS3 2JX England Follow signs for Ashton Court. The nursery can be found on Clannage Road, and is situated in the Cricket Grounds



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Learning At Home Activities

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Age Groups: Infant, Toddler, Preschool
Play Dough Cakes for Counting Fun
You will need:

Play Dough
Rolling Pin
Cutters
Muffin Tins
Cellophane inserts from biscuit packets
Paper cake cases
Buttons
Birthday cake candles

Directions:

Play alongside your child making cakes with the play dough, roll into balls in your hand or use a rolling pin and cutters.
Place one paper cake case into each ‘hole’ in the tin or cellophane insert, counting out each one aloud.
Do the same when adding your play dough cakes to each paper case. It’s important that children hear this one- to- one counting with objects.
You can then make cherries with small bits of play dough or add buttons, or candles to the top of each cake, again counting each one aloud as you place it on top of the cake. When you and your child have finished, count each cake then affirm the final amount e.g. “we have made six cakes”.
You can add some stretch and challenge by helping your child work out how many cakes are needed for family members and how many will be left, or how many more are needed.

Tip:

This fun counting activity helps children acquire five important counting principles proposed by Gelman and Gallistel (1978) in meaningful ways.
1. One to one correspondence: principle Understanding that a number word is assigned to an item.
2. Stable order principle: Understanding that order of number words is always consistent. Ideally this should be the conventionally accepted sequence of number words.
3. Cardinal principle: Understanding that the final number said signifies the number in the set.
4. Abstraction principle: Understanding counting can be applied to anything.
5. Order- irrelevance principle: Understanding that items can be counted in any order so long as each item is only counted once.


Age Groups: Infant, Toddler, Preschool
Writing Shopping Lists Together
You will need:

A note pad
A pen or pencil

Directions:

When you sit down to write your shopping list provide your child with a shopping list note pad and pen and sit together writing your lists.
As you write talk about what you are writing down “We need more milk”. “I need some tomatoes”. Ask your child to write down what he/she thinks you need to buy.
Take your shopping lists with you when you go shopping and refer to them as you go round the supermarket. “This says I need to get some tomatoes”. “What does your list tell you to get”.
Don’t worry if your child’s marks and squiggles don’t look like words, your child will be able to recall what his or her marks mean.

Tip:

When children see adults writing they perceive that writing is important. This this creates a inspiration to be a writer and to be part of this fascinating world of writing and reading.
By sitting at you elbow as you write your child will see how spoken words are converted to words and will imitate what you are doing. This is an important element of creating a desire to write for a purpose.
This activity will help your child develop an understanding of the instrumental function of writing and how it helps to him/her to obtain goods and services.


Age Group: Preschool
Christmas Thank You Letters
You will need:

A pen or pencil
Writing Paper
Envelopes

Directions:

A thank you letter to family and friends will always be much appreciated and is a great activity to do on a quiet day soon after Christmas.
Settle down together and create a list recalling the gifts received from family and friends. This recalling activity is good for building memory skills. A wise tip is write a list on Christmas day of the gifts received and who sent them. If your child needs some help remembering you could prompt memory recall by saying, “it was something beginning with L”, “something you can build with…”
If your child is at the stage of copy writing, write down what your child wants to say in the thank you letter then they can copy this onto the paper. Say the words out loud as you write as this helps your child to see that spoken word can be spoken.
If your child is at an earlier stage of making marks you could write the letter leaving spaces for them to draw a picture of the gift they received or cut pictures from a catalogue to stick in to the spaces.
If your child is a more confident writer you could introduce a junior dictionary to help them find the words they need.
Fold the letter to fit into an envelope then use your address book to help your child find the address to send it too. Stick on a stamp then wrap up warm to go out and post the thank you letters in the letter box.

Tip:


Age Group: Preschool
Salt Dough Christmas Decorations
You will need:

1 cup of flour
1 cup of salt
1 cup of water
A rolling pin
Shaped Christmas cutters
Glitter and decorations
Ribbon

Directions:

Make some salt dough together mixing I cup of flour with I cup of salt and adding up to I cup of water a little at a time until the dough is pliable but not sticky. Knead for about 10 minutes on a floured surface then roll out flat with a rolling pin. Add more flour to the surface and the rolling pin to avoid the dough sticking.
Use Christmas shape cookie cutters such as stars, trees and angels and cut out a range of shapes. Place these on grease proof paper on a baking tray then carefully make a hole in the top of each shape. Bake the salt dough shapes at 100 degrees Celsius for about 2 to 3 hours until hard. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.
Decorate with PVA glue and glitter or paint with shiny water based paint. When dry thread Christmassy ribbon through the holes. Tie a knot then hang on your tree year after year.

Tip:


Age Groups: Infant, Toddler, Preschool
Writing in the Sand
You will need:

Sand - or a sunny beach
A stick or index finger

Directions:

Use a stick to make marks in the sand - vertical and horizontal lines, circles and crosses are good to start with.
Encourage your child to copy you then ask him/her to make marks for you to copy.
Talk about the marks and letters you make and the movements you do to make them. “I’m starting here, then going down, then stop”. “I’m starting here then going round and round and round”. “I’m going to make M for Mummy”

Tip:

This helps your child develop skills and confidence in forming and connecting the curves, vertical, horizontal and zig-zag lines that form the bias of letter shapes.
Starting big then gradually working down to smaller develops as your child’s hand and eye co-ordination skills and manual dexterity skills mature and integrate.
As your child associates the language of the mark or letter shape with the action of forming these, he/she will be getting kinesthetic feedback which is essential for any motor action.
Kinesthesia is the knowledge of where each body part is and direction in which it is moving.
It is an important component of motor control for legible handwriting.