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Growing Readers

Growing Readers has been specially created to nurture your child to become an independent reader and inspire a love for books and stories.
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Growing Writers

Our Growing Writer’s programme supports your child’s magical journey to becoming a confident writer.
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Growing Mathematicians

Mathematics is embedded in everything that we do and experience in our day-to-day lives
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Explore our Curriculum

At Bright Horizons, we create safe, soothing and stimulating environments in which your child can play, discover and develop all of the skills needed to become a confident, positive and well-rounded individual.

We also understand the needs of busy parents. Our Learning Fun Club and Back-Up Care Programmes help family life to run smoothly and parents are able to go to work knowing their children are in a wonderful and safe learning environment where they can have fun, develop and be inspired.

Learning At Home Activities

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Age Groups: Infant, Toddler, Preschool
Play Dough Cakes for Counting Fun
You will need:

Play Dough
Rolling Pin
Cutters
Muffin Tins
Cellophane inserts from biscuit packets
Paper cake cases
Buttons
Birthday cake candles

Directions:

Play alongside your child making cakes with the play dough, roll into balls in your hand or use a rolling pin and cutters.
Place one paper cake case into each ‘hole’ in the tin or cellophane insert, counting out each one aloud.
Do the same when adding your play dough cakes to each paper case. It’s important that children hear this one- to- one counting with objects.
You can then make cherries with small bits of play dough or add buttons, or candles to the top of each cake, again counting each one aloud as you place it on top of the cake. When you and your child have finished, count each cake then affirm the final amount e.g. “we have made six cakes”.
You can add some stretch and challenge by helping your child work out how many cakes are needed for family members and how many will be left, or how many more are needed.

Tip:

This fun counting activity helps children acquire five important counting principles proposed by Gelman and Gallistel (1978) in meaningful ways.
1. One to one correspondence: principle Understanding that a number word is assigned to an item.
2. Stable order principle: Understanding that order of number words is always consistent. Ideally this should be the conventionally accepted sequence of number words.
3. Cardinal principle: Understanding that the final number said signifies the number in the set.
4. Abstraction principle: Understanding counting can be applied to anything.
5. Order- irrelevance principle: Understanding that items can be counted in any order so long as each item is only counted once.


Age Group: Preschool
Thirsty Celery
You will need:

Red and blue food colouring
2 clear plastic cups
2 stalks of celery
Water
Magnifying Glass

Directions:

Adult Guided Activity

Trim the bottom and top of the celery (adult only)
Put a small amount of food colouring in each of the plastic cups and fill them with water
Place a celery stalk in each cup and leave in a warm place overnight

Developing Investigation and Enquiry

Talk about what has happened to the celery stalks


  • Why do you think it has started to change colour?

  • How did the celery 'drink' the water?

  • How did the water get up the celery stalk?

  • Can you see the tiny tubes in the celery?


Introduce the word xylem to explain the tubes that transport up the stalk. Use the magnifying glass to see the xylem.

Tip:

Keeping Everyone Safe

Role model safe cutting when using a sharp knife to cut celery.


Age Groups: Infant, Toddler, Preschool
Writing Shopping Lists Together
You will need:

A note pad
A pen or pencil

Directions:

When you sit down to write your shopping list provide your child with a shopping list note pad and pen and sit together writing your lists.
As you write talk about what you are writing down “We need more milk”. “I need some tomatoes”. Ask your child to write down what he/she thinks you need to buy.
Take your shopping lists with you when you go shopping and refer to them as you go round the supermarket. “This says I need to get some tomatoes”. “What does your list tell you to get”.
Don’t worry if your child’s marks and squiggles don’t look like words, your child will be able to recall what his or her marks mean.

Tip:

When children see adults writing they perceive that writing is important. This this creates a inspiration to be a writer and to be part of this fascinating world of writing and reading.
By sitting at your elbow as you write, your child will see how spoken words are converted to words and will imitate what you are doing. This is an important element of creating a desire to write for a purpose.
This activity will help your child develop an understanding of the instrumental function of writing and how it helps to him/her to obtain goods and services.


Age Group: Infant
Free Movement Activities
You will need:

Directions:

Babies need daily opportunities to move freely on their tummies in a variety of stimulating, safe spaces without constraints such as clothing, or straps in baby chairs.

Floor Time

Put your baby on the floor on different surfaces and materials, eg blankets, changing mat, and in different positions, eg, front, back and each side. This will encourage free movement and balance.

Tummy Time

- Let your baby have lots of tummy time from as early as possible - little and often is best. This will encourage neck and head control.

- Lie little one on your chest while sitting in a reclined position or lying down.

- Get down on the floor with your baby. This will help their balance, as they sense the ground beneath them.

- Encourage interaction through talking, singing and shaking toys.

- Incorporate tummy time into nappy changes.

- Interact with your baby in lots of different ways - talking about what you're doing and about what they're doing, singing and reading. This will encourage listening and moving.

- Spend time stroking their hands and feet using different soft items such as feathers, ribbons and cuddly toys, and hard items such as plastic toys. This is good for sensory stimulation.

- Carry your child in different positions - in arms, on shoulder, face down on forearm. This helps with their neck and head control.

Experience the Outdoors

Take your baby outside for a walk in a pram or place on a rug/blanket, or grass if dry, under a tree to watch the leaves. This will stimulate their senses.

Tip:


Age Group: Preschool
Fun With Measuring
You will need:

• Paper or card
• Crayons and or felt tipped pens
• Stickers
• Things to measure
• Scissors

Directions:

• Create a set of measuring hands for measuring how long, how wide, how tall and how short things are at home.

• These non-standard units of measure help children understand the concept of using units to measure items.

• Draw round hands, then cut them out and decorate with crayons, felt tipped pens or stickers.

• Number each hand, then start measuring.

• Count how many hands wide, long and tall items or people are.

• Record these results and compare them to find out which is the shortest, longest, widest and tallest.

Tip:

How this activity helps develop early maths learning

Children typically progress through a series of stages in understanding measurement (Copley, 2000):

1 Comprehending that objects can be compared and measured and understanding the meaning of questions like “how long is this?”, “how heavy is that?” etc.

2 Making comparisons themselves, such as judging which pencil is shorter, which pebble is heavier, etc.

3 Determining an appropriate unit and process for measurement.

4 Using standard units of measurement (centimetre, grammes, etc.).

5 Creating and using formulas to help count units.

During the preschool and reception class years, children primarily focus on stages 1 and 2 and may begin to work on the concept of “unit” in the third step. Steps four and five are typically focused on in the primary school years.

Copley, J. V. (2000). The Young Child and Mathematics. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.